Archive | Pistols

What? A Double Barrel Pistol! The AF2011-A1

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What? A Double Barrel Pistol! The AF2011-A1

Posted on 30 April 2014 by David Allred

AF2011-A1 Double Barrel PistolThe AF2011-A1 Double Barrel Pistol is the very first industrial double barrel pistol of all time. For those of you who love shooting the Colt 1911-A1, the AF2011-A1 was designed in commemoration of its legend. This bad boy packs a punch as a double barrel .45 caliber pistol and is extremely accurate. According to Arsenal Firearms, it will group all 16 bullets, held in a dual, single column magazine, in a target the size of an orange at 15 yards and in a watermelon at 15 yards. In around 3 seconds, with only 8 trigger pulls, you can fire 16 rounds into a target.

Man, if only Chuck Norris could get his hands on this collectors item. Then again, Chuck doesn’t need a gun!

The AF2011-A1 double barrel pistol has some pretty cool features.

  • Many of it’s parts are interchangeable with the 1911-A1, which makes repair and replacement parts cheaper, and more available. Interchangeable parts include the firing pins, recoil springs and rods, magazine bodies and inner parts, grips, sites, etc…
  • It has a single slide, single grip safety, single hammer and instead of two magazines, it’s a single column with dual magazines. So instead of having to load two single magazines, drop one and load one!
  • I read somewhere that it comes with the option to have the ability to fire each trigger separately as well as simultaneously. I didn’t see that option anywhere on the Arsenal Firearms website, so I’m just chalking that up to be a rumor.

AF2011-A1 Double Barrel PistolsMy first thoughts about a double barrel pistol were:

I’ve tried to pull the triggers of two pistols while holding them side by side. It’s not an easy thing to do. One trigger always gets pulled before the other. So I doubted even wanting to have the option to fire each trigger separately. However, by including two triggers, two barrels and one slide into this double barrel pistol, it automatically eliminates the struggle of holding two pistols side by side. However, if you want separate firing triggers, why not just use two pistols, which can each be pointed at their own targets? Sure, if the AF2011-A1 did come with the option to fire each barrel separately, you could probably pull the left trigger with your left hand and the right with your right hand.

This takes a whole new meaning to the term, “Dual Wielding!”

I think I’d rather have them fire at the same time, delivering twice the impact of a regular .45.

AF2011-A1 Double Barrel Pistol with HolstersDo the barrels fire straight or are the slightly angled in, toward each other? Maybe this proves my lack of engineering knowledge, but it was one of my first thoughts. If you think about hitting a target, you want to hit it dead center. With the double barrel pistol, you’ll always miss dead center and hit one round a little left and one a little right.

But then I realized, would you rather have two rounds enter an assailant through the same hole, or hit them twice…one on each side of his chest?

Answered my own question.

PLUS, think about the diversity here when choosing your rounds. You can load one side of the magazine with hollow point rounds while loading the other side with armor piercing rounds. It’ll get the job done one way or the other!

AF2011-A1 Double Barrel Pistol with MagazineIn closing, too many guns to buy and so little time! The AF2011-A1 double barrel pistol is definitely one to add to the collection.

Before you click away, you must, and I say MUST watch the video below. The first minute is sort of boring, but right around 1:05 when he starts firing the pistol, it’s just plain awesome!

If you can picture the last movie you watched where someone fires a pistol in slow motion…the movement of the slide, the explosion of the bullet from the barrel with the shell being ejected and the lingering puff of smoke! Just picture double of all that, and that’s what’s in the video.

Here’s a link to the double barrel pistol on Arsenal Firearms.

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Concealed Weapons – Concealing a Firearm in Your Vehicle

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Concealed Weapons – Concealing a Firearm in Your Vehicle

Posted on 14 March 2012 by David Allred

If you currently hold a concealed weapons permit, are about to get one or live in a state that allows you to carry a concealed weapon, here are a few ways you can conceal a weapon in your vehicle.

The Obvious Places to Conceal a Weapon

There are some obvious places and not so obvious places to conceal a firearm in your vehicle. Some of the obvious spots are:

  • The glove box
  • The console
  • Under the seat
  • Between the seat and the console
  • In the drivers side or passenger side door compartments

Most of these places are obvious spots to conceal a weapon because they’re the easiest places. It doesn’t take much effort to toss a pistol and a few magazines into the glove box before a road trip. Nor does it take much effort to place a weapon under the seat. Easy equals obvious.

Now, I’m not implying that it’s a bad thing to conceal a weapon in any of these places. Having a weapon in the car is better than not having a weapon in the car. However, you have to think about keeping that firearm out of the wrong hands should your car fall victim to vandalism. Burglars are looking for things of value to quickly snag as they walk past your vehicle. A pistol would make a mighty nice prize and turn an average car thief into a more dangerous threat.

Here recently, our neighborhood was frequently hit by a burglar. His primary targets were vehicles. When he was finally caught, he had a knife in his coat pocket, a pistol in his back pocket and a backpack containing four other pistols and enough ammunition to start a small war. It all came from his streak of vandalism.

Vehicle Console Vault - Vehicle Gun VaultHe was caught by a man leaving on an archery hunt at 4am. When approached, the burglar went for his pocket but before he could draw his weapon, the hunter whacked him on the head with his revolver. Just awesome!

If you’re going to secure a pistol in an obvious place in your car, just make sure it’s out of site. If you can help it, make sure someone can’t steal it. For example, you can use a vehicle console vault shown in the picture. You can order them with a key lock or combination lock.

Less Obvious Places to Conceal a Weapon

Depending on the vehicle you drive, there are several places to mount a pistol while keeping it out of site and in a less obvious spot. The dilemma I always face in choosing to carry a weapon in my vehicle is ease of use versus security. On one hand, I want to make sure my pistol is hidden well enough so that it doesn’t get stolen. On the other hand, in case of an emergency, I want to be able to access my weapon very quickly.

With a holster such as the picture below, a pistol can be mounted just about anywhere in your vehicle.

Under Dashboard Mount Holster

Under the Dashboard

Mounting a pistol under the drivers side dashboard is possibly your best option. Depending on the positioning, your weapon will be completely out of site when peering in through the window while being completely accessible in case of an emergency.

Under Dashboard Mounted Pistol

In the Headrest

I’ve also heard of those who have successful concealed a small pistol in the headrest of their seats. The compartment would have to be custom work and sealed with Velcro to appear normal. But hey, if a TV monitor can be mounted in a headrest, so can a small pistol.

In the Ceiling

Another place to conceal a pistol would be in the ceiling matting. I’ve seen pistols mounted behind ceiling lights, TV monitors and in random locations on the ceilings of vehicles with thicker padding.

On the Ceiling

Just mount your weapon on the ceiling of your vehicle. There are a ton of mounting systems and gun racks on the market that can be easily attached to the ceiling of your car. They come with or without locking systems. This probably isn’t the best option when trying to hide your weapon from a burglar, but you’d be surprised by how many people never look up when robbing a car.

Ceiling Gun Mount

In the Trunk

In the trunk is a great place to conceal your weapons. The only downfall is the accessibility. Most trunks can be accessed from inside the vehicles within a few seconds, but sometimes a few seconds is all you have. Plus, most burglars won’t look in the trunk of a car and are more interested in the eye candy. If they can see it through the window, the more likely they’ll break in to get it.

Trunk Gun Mount

Behind the Back Seat Console

Many vehicles are now equipped with a console for the back seat. It flips up and down to hold drinks and miscellaneous items. When up, it looks like the rest of the seat. It’s very easy to access from anywhere in the car and most burglars won’t check it, or even notice it.

Behind a Fake Stereo Faceplate

Anyone who has ever installed a new stereo knows that many of them come with detachable face plates. I’ve seen pictures of a compartment behind that faceplate, just big enough for a pistol. The only problem with this….many burglars try to steal stereos. Last time I checked, guns are worth more than stereos!

On the Side of the Console

Depending on the vehicle, a great place for easy access would be to mount the pistol to the side of the front console. Again, depending on the vehicle, it may be extremely visible to anyone passing by or it may be fairly concealed. In the case of this picture, it would probably be hidden fairly well.

Side of Console Pistol Mount

Inserted in Drivers Side Seat

Another great spot would be inside the front side of the drivers side seat. Depending on the design of the seat, there should be enough room to carve out a little compartment into the front of the seat for safe concealment of a weapon.

Conclusion

In case of an emergency, carrying a pistol in your vehicle can get you out of jam. Creativity is the key and you’re life or those of who you love are the prize. Make sure that you are in accordance with your local and state laws when you conceal any weapon in your vehicle. In my humble opinion, when it comes to my safety, it’s better to ask for forgiveness than permission.

I’m curious to know where you have placed your weapon in your vehicles. What has worked for you? Please leave a comment below.

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Dyson LePetit Protector Ring Pistol

Posted on 11 January 2012 by David Allred

LePetit Protector Ring GunTo add to our collection of rare and collectible guns here on The Gunsman, check out this little bad boy. It’s called the Dyson LePetit Protector and was sold primarily to gamblers. I’ve seen both a five shot and a six shot ring pistol and have provided images of both for you below. I know for sure that the five shot ring gun is chambered in 5mm, but the six shot looks to be a bit smaller to me.

How Does It Work?

Petit Ring PistolIf you take a close look, you’ll see three levers. The largest one towards the top is the hammer, the one on the side and in the middle (in this photo) is used to release/spin the chambers. The smallest lever is the trigger.

I don’t imagine the kick on this little package of concealed protection would be anything to Petit Protector Ring Pistolfret about. If anything, when fired, it might feel like flicking yourself on the finger. Each ring gun comes with a tiny flat head screw driver and sometimes you’ll see other tools which are used in ejecting the empty cartridges. If you look really closely at the rounds, you’ll see a little pin near the primer end of the round. That pin is probably the only thing LePetit Ring Pistolpreventing the rounds from falling out the front side of the chamber.

I couldn’t find any evidence of these still being manufactured today and assume that a few of the guns rings in these images are over 100 years old. The quality of workmanship is amazing to me with designs to make the gun appear like a nice fat ring that, if used with a right hook, could render a grown man unconscious!

LePetit Protector Ring GunHow Much Does it Sell For?

I’ve seen the older, more antique ring guns sold for $13,000 online at iCollector.com. However, total sale price included two ring pistols as a set. One for him and one for her. A match made in heaven.

Great collectors item, but if you want to shoot it often, you’ll probably have to get your rounds custom made. I wouldn’t mind owning one of these little pistols for myself.

If you know anything more about the Dyson LePetit Protector ring gun, I’d like to hear about it.

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The Desert Eagle .50 Caliber Pistol

Posted on 11 October 2011 by David Allred

Custom Desert Eagle .50 Caliber PistolSay hello to my little friend, the Desert Eagle .50 Caliber pistol! Continue Reading

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List of 50 Caliber Pistols

Posted on 03 October 2011 by David Allred

There’s not very many .50 caliber pistols being manufactured out there, and it’s a shame. So I did a bit of research and have listed the ones I could find below.

Government Industries 50 Caliber 1911Government Industries .50 Caliber 1911

The 50GI is a low pressure round that doesn’t give you a big concussion blast like high pressure rounds such as the 10mm does. This makes it more tactically sound in a firefight. The 50GI case was designed with a .45ACP case head size which allows for a barrel and magazine swap so either round can be used in the same pistol with only a barrel and mag swap. This further increases its versatility and value.

Smith & Wesson 50 Caliber RevolverSmith & Wesson .50 Caliber Revolver

This pistol comes with different barrel lengths. Personally, sometimes size does matter! But then again, if you have to conceal a pistol, you can enjoy the same quality 50 caliber pistol from Smith & Wesson but with a shorter barrel and different purpose.

Desert Eagle .50 Caliber PistolDesert Eagle .50 Caliber Pistol

The Desert Eagle was the first 50 caliber pistol I was able to fire. When I think of a .50 caliber pistol, the Desert Eagle is always the first one that comes to mind. On top of that, my choice is always semi-auto over revolver.

AMT Automag  .50 Caliber PistolAMT Automag IV .50 Caliber Pistol

I’m not so sure that AMT still manufactures this pistol, but there are some still out there on the market. It holds six rounds and would sell on the open market for around $800 US.

Grizzly Win Mag .50 CaliberGrizzly WinMag .50 Caliber Pistol

I know for a fact that the Grizzly WinMag is no longer in production and all models are sold out. However, it seems as though Grizzly still offers parts for it. Grizzly seems to be moving more towards their .50 caliber rifles in production.

 

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10 of My Favorite Guns

Posted on 24 August 2011 by David Allred

  1. Desert EagleSig Saur .40
  2. AR-15
  3. Remington 12 gauge
  4. Savage 30 ot 6
  5. Smith and Wesson .22 cal revolver
  6. 20 gauge/.22 cal Over-under
  7. The Saw
  8. M-16
  9. Semi-automatic .22 cal rifle
  10. Desert Eagle .50 cal Pistol

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